Monday, January 12, 2009

Would Jesus watch the Big Game with Saints or Sinners?

Time for this annual controversy. Should we skip/cancel/postpone/adjust our church service to watch the Super Bowl?

Which person do you think is the most spiritual?

1. The Arrogant guy who proudly proclaims, "It's my Christian duty to attend Church; I won't be watching the Super Bowl!"

2. The Arrogant guy who loudly proclaims, "It's my Christian liberty to skip Church; I'll be watching the Super Bowl!"

3. The gal who says, "What's all this fuss about - we don't have church on Sunday Evenings anyways."

4. The guy who invites his unbelieving friends to his Super Bowl Party at Church

5. The gal who invites her unbelieving friends to her Super Bowl Party at Home?

6. The guy who says, "I don't even like football."

Feel free to add your own categories in the comments.

5 comments:

Jeff Myers said...

I think we should go to church on Super Bowl Sunday and take the REST of the year off.

Seriously, though...what about churches who show the Super Bowl on the big screen at church even though the NFL has expressly stated that it is illegal for churches to do so?

Travis Penn said...

Maybe somebody will chime in on biblical civil disobedience, but I haven't seen a strong argument for disregarding the law on this one.

Crystal said...

I hate this controversy because it never leads anywhere. We just talk about it year after year. I think with the advent of TIVO and DVR the question should be moot.

You can go to church and then go home or to your party and watch the entire event....WITH NO COMMERCIALS!

(Although I must admit that I only watch the commercials so I save the recording and watch the commercials the next day...just to see what all the hype is about.)

Jacob said...

It's all about motive.

Tim Toomey said...

The NFL has reduced its' restrictions this year.

"The NFL still stands by its initial statement concerning copyright laws. .... however.
They highlighted the “homestyle exemption” which allows viewings that would normally violate the law as noninfringing. In the exemption, a performance of a televised game will be excused if such performance is “on a single receiving apparatus of a kind commonly used in private homes.” This is provided that the hosts do not charge a fee or transmit it as a public event.

Considering that big-screen televisions and even projection units are now common in homes, it provides a mean for churches to show the games again.

We are having a Superbowl party this year at our church.